Stagecoach

Stagecoach marks the 10th anniversary of London bombings

07 Jul 2015

  • Driver of bombed Stagecoach bus among those attending commemoration service
  • Employees join national minute’s silence to honour victims, families and survivors
  • Nation pays tribute to courage and compassion in response to attacks

Stagecoach Group is today remembering the many people whose lives were changed forever by the terrorist attack in London 10 years ago.

On 7 July 2005, 52 innocent people were killed and hundreds more injured in a series of bombings targeted at London's transport network and those using it. 

A number 30 Stagecoach bus at Tavistock Square, driven by George Psaradakis, was among the transport services bombed by terrorists, resulting in the deaths of 13 people and injuries to many others.

On the tenth anniversary of the London terrorist bombings, a series of events are being held to mark the courage and compassion shown in response to the attacks.

Stagecoach Group is paying tribute to those affected by the events and recognising the bravery of employees that were involved on the day.

To honour and remember those killed and injured and their families, Stagecoach will be represented at a service of commemoration in St Paul’s Cathedral today. Attending the event will be driver George Psaradakis, current Stagecoach London Managing Director Mark Threapleton, former Stagecoach London Managing Director Barry Arnold, who was responsible for the business at the time of the bombings, and West Ham Operations Manager Ray White. 

Employees across Stagecoach Group will also observe a nationwide minute’s silence at 11.30am today. 

The company has also made a donation to the Tavistock Square Memorial Trust towards a permanent memorial in Tavistock Square Gardens. 

Stagecoach Group Chief Executive Martin Griffiths said: “This is a poignant day for our company. The lives of many of our customers and employees were changed forever 10 years ago during these terrible events that we will never forget.

“Today we honour the memory of those who lost their lives and the bravery of the survivors, as well as paying tribute to the first responders and other members of the public who were intimately involved in the attacks and their aftermath.”

Driver George Psaradakis will be carrying a candle of remembrance as part of the service of commemoration. George continues to work for Stagecoach and still plays an important role in the delivery of bus services across London which serve millions of people each day.

George Psaradakis said: "My faith in God has helped me recover from my emotional injuries of that horrendous day. I am also thankful for the generous and kind support of my family, friends, colleagues and Stagecoach London, which has kept me employed and looked after me since this tragedy."

Stagecoach London Managing Director Mark Threapleton added: “Although ten years have passed, the events of 7 July 2005 stay fresh in the minds of many people who were involved in that day. Of the many passengers on board our bus that day, 13 didn’t return home to their friends and families and many more were injured. It’s important that we take time to remember those who lost their lives and those who were directly affected on that day.

“I must also pay tribute to our driver, George who, ten years on is still working for Stagecoach London. I am proud of his positive attitude and I am grateful to the colleagues who have supported him and each other over the last decade.”

Stagecoach London also recognised the events of 7/7 by launching a new bus to replace the vehicle destroyed in the bombings. The bus, named the ‘Spirit of London’ was officially launched in October 2005 by former London Mayor Ken Livingstone. At the time, it was the first of a new generation of British designed and built double deckers. The bus operates on routes in East London and is based at the Rainham garage.